Bio Bot | Jake Vanderweyden

Hook – Firehole Sticks 516 #14-16

Bead – 3mm Slotted Tungsten

Thread – Olive UTC 70D

Tail – Coq De Leon Med Pardo

Body – Olive Hareline Turkey Biot

Rib – Olive UTC Ultra Wire 

Thorax/Collar – Natural CDC/Hares Ear

Tied by Jake Vanderweyden (@theflyfiend)

Featured in “Best Ties for Summer Flies” in the Summer 2021 issue of Fly Fusion

Henneberry Hopper | Jeremy Davies

This is a very realistic hopper pattern that is quite easy to tie and floats like a cork. You simply have to buy the foam bodies and tie legs, antron wing and an indicator on it. I started using this pattern about three years ago and was immediately impressed by how it accurately mimics a hopper and that it was impossible to sink. I have found this pattern to be particularly effective in late summer when streams are low and super clear. It also quite easy to see and takes are often very subtle almost like the manner that a trout sips a caddis or mayfly.

Hook: 2x long dry fly hook sz 8 to 12

Thread: Tan Uni-Thread 8/0

Body: MFC Foam Hopper Bodies- tan, yellow or gray

Wing: Tan MFC Widows Web or Antron yarn

Indicator: Orange foam or yarn

Legs: Barred Tan rubber legs

Featured in “Best Ties for Summer Flies” in the Summer 2021 issue of Fly Fusion

Elk Hair Caddis | Frank Brassard

Elk Hair Caddis:

Hatches through the summer (May to Sept). Imitates various types of caddis flies. Tied in size 10 to 14.

Hook: Hanak H130BL

Thread: Textreme 8/0

Body: Semperfli Dirty Bug Yarn in Litchen

Hackle: Whiting’s High and Dry Grizzly

Wing: Elk Hair and Swiss CDC

Egg Sack: Gulff UV Resin in Ambulance Chartreuse

 

  • From “Best Ties for Summer Flies” featured in the Summer 2021 issue of Fly Fusion

Best Ties for Summer Flies | Simple Summer Nymphs

If you haven’t already picked up a copy of the Summer issue, now is the time to do it!  This “Fly Tying Triple-Header” covers off the Pro’s top recommendations for dries, terrestrials and nymphs to use this season.  The five patterns below are Jake Vanderweyden’s (@theflyfiend) picks, complete with recipes for you tying pleasure!

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Miami Vise | Lucas Utrera

Lucas Utrera is a fly tyer born in Córdoba, Argentina, currently residing in Miami, USA. He started fly tying in 1996 at the early age of 12. He dabbled in commercial tying for some year, but later dedicated most of his time to tying special flies for collectors and participating in competitions. He is currently a member of the AhrexGulff and Semperfli Pro Team.

Add these 6 patterns (with materials list) to your arsenal today!

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Reece’s Subsurface Sensations | Bob Reece

Progress often provides opportunity. In the world of fly tying, recent advances in materials have fuelled the creation of subsurface imitations that were previously not feasible. The three patterns in this article were created to raise the bar for durability and productivity.

Spring Arsenal | Jake Vanderweyden

After a long cold Canadian winter of dreaming of warmer days on the water, restocking fly arsenals, spooling up new lines and patching your favourite waders. Spring is always a season every angler looks forward to. The start of a new fly fishing year, exploring new waters, camping and hiking deep into the backwoods with friends. Having a wide range of fly patterns is essential for any early spring fly fishing adventure.

Read more to see materials list for 6 patterns Jake keeps in his Spring Aresnal!

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Reece’s Stepchild Stone | Bob Reece

by Bob Reece

When discussions surrounding stoneflies arise, images of gargantuan invertebrates come to mind. The large end of the plecopteran spectrum does play a role in the annual feeding cycle of trout. However, the more petite species and developmental stages of stoneflies should not be overlooked.    

As nymphs grow, they shed their exoskeletons. These developmental stages are referred to as instars. The number of instars varies among species, from 12 to 23.  As a result, there are different sizes of nymphs present during the year in the freestone streams and rivers they inhabit.   

In late spring and early summer the increased flows of runoff provide enough energy to detach even the largest nymphs from the rocky substrate. This increased flow is often accompanied by a decline in water clarity. These two factors create an ideal environment for larger-profile nymph patterns.  The increased weight of these artificial bugs helps get them to depth in higher flows, while their superior silhouette helps make them more visible. This window of ideal conditions is productive, yet makes up a small part of the annual aquatic food cycle. 

Prior to and following runoff, the volume and velocity of the water is lower and the clarity higher. This combination creates a more suitable environment for presenting stonefly nymphs in smaller sizes. While large stonefly nymphs are still present in the substrate, their abundance in the moving water column drops due to the reduction in subsurface velocity. The smaller species and lesser instars are at a greater risk of being stripped from their holds than the big nymphs, due to their smaller size and lesser strength. 

It was for this larger window of conditions that I created the Stepchild Stone. I wanted a pattern that would accurately match the structural and behavioural profile of smaller developing stoneflies. The foundation this of this pattern is its behavioural profile. Stonefly nymphs are not effective swimmers, and when knocked free by the current often assume a hunched or curled position. This action reduces their overall surface area and helps expedite their descent back to the stream bottom. The Stepchild Stone is tied on the Gamakatsu C12U hook. The shape of this hook creates a drastically hunched appearance in the fly, mimicking the behaviour of the naturals. In addition, the sturdy construction and wide gap helps to ensure that it hooks and holds fish.  

In a further effort to match behavioural traits, I used MFC Sexi Floss for the tail, legs and antennae. The supple flexibility of this material allows it to crawl with life in the water. Its transparency and flat profile provide an accurate imitation of the naturals. That same element of transparency is present in the stretch tubing that is used for the abdomen. Complimenting this is the reflective quality of the Ice Dub used for the thorax. This synthetic dubbing radiates a mottled array of colours that are visible through the transparent wing cases of natural bustard Thin Skin. 

While small in size, the Stepchild Stone is not lacking in weight. Its duel tungsten beads provide the mass needed for a rapid descent to the desired depth. Tactical UV Resin overlays the beads and wing cases. The fly’s sink rate is aided by the intentionally thin abdomen which offers less resistance as the fly drops through the water column. 

When fishing this pattern I usually use it as the bottom fly in an indicator or tight-line setup. I have also had significant success using it as a dropper below large foam terrestrial patterns in late summer and early fall. Regardless of the application, I always attach the Stepchild Stone with a non-slip loop-knot. This provides exceptional strength and allows the fly to move freely in the current.  Click here to watch tying video. 

Martian Invasion | Peter Stitcher

Peter Stitcher | Ascent Fly Fishing | ascentflyfishing.com

Trout need to see your flies if they are going to eat them.  This can be a challenge with traditional fly patterns when the sun starts to sink but the bite remains hot and trout look to continue to feed throughout the night.  The Martian series of flies were hatched to help the angler hack the science of trout vision and land more and bigger fish all throughout the night.  As the sun recedes into the west each evening, so do the cone receptors within the eyes of trout that are responsible for interpreting light as different colors.  The result is that your favorite red, green, and blue fly patterns all fade to black and blend into the dark backdrop of the river.  Trout feeding at night, therefore, key into the intensity of light and contrast created by mixing light and dark colored materials in our patterns. Designed by Aquatic Biologist and Ascent Fly Fishing owner Peter Stitcher, the Martian series of flies were created to exploit the night vision of trout and inevitably draw them through the river to eat our flies.  Like a UFO parked over a Kentucky trailer park, the glow in the dark materials used in these patterns will beam unsuspecting trout out of the river and into your landing net.  So, the next time you head to your favorite fishing hole at night, put in your earbuds, turn up Thomas Dolby’s “She Blinded Me With Science” and embrace the Martian invasion!

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What’s New in the Tying Game?

If you’re like me, you spend an unhealthy amount of time looking at fly fishing gear. Though you may not need that new seal disc drag fly reel or the matching blue backing, you still look, nonetheless. Those of us who tie tend to fall into the same routine, clicking that “What’s New” category in fly tying, to see the latest and greatest in the fly tying world. We do this knowing we probably won’t deviate far from the pheasant tails, hares ears, caddis, and simulators that overflow our boxes. Yet, these days, it seems like there are new products to be excited about; and unlike rods, reels, waders, and boots, fly tying materials often don’t break the bank.

In the Spring issue, I reviewed some newly released fly tying products to see if they live up to the hype.  Following are a few patterns I tied up in the process.

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